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CPBF Briefing on Product Placement October 2009 E-mail
Written by Jonathan Hardy   
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 15:53

 

            CPBF BRIEFING ON PRODUCT PLACEMENT
-- 6 October 2009 --
 
Product placement is an advertising technique whereby advertisers pay to have their products included and promoted in television programmes. Editorial staff, scriptwriters and producers amend scripts and plots so as to feature and promote certain products. Words are put into the mouths of TV characters to advertise certain goods and brands. Currently only unpaid ‘prop’ supply is permitted and commercial references are subject to rules against ‘undue prominence’
The CPBF, together with viewers’ organisations and consumer bodies, opposes the introduction of paid placement. Product placement would allow programme agendas to be distorted for commercial purposes and give advertisers unhealthy control over decisions about what content is shown and commissioned.
Last Updated on Thursday, 22 July 2010 12:03
 
Submission to DCMS on the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (October 2008) E-mail
Written by Jonathan Hardy   
Wednesday, 21 July 2010 16:06

CONSULTATION ON PROPOSALS FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF THE AUDIOVISUAL MEDIA SERVICES DIRECTIVE
IN THE UNITED KINGDOM
 
Submission by the Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom (CPBF)
 
Introduction
 
The Campaign for Press and Broadcasting Freedom is the UK’s leading independent organisation campaigning for a more democratic, accountable and plural media. We have been in existence since 1979 and have campaigned consistently in favour or media freedom, for public service broadcasting and for greater equality of representation in, and accountability of, the mass media. The CPBF brings together members of the public and people working within the industry in an ongoing dialogue about the media and its role in society.
 
General comments on implementation of the Audiovisual Media Services Directive
 
We welcome the extension of regulation to cover all scheduled television services, regardless of the means of delivery, and the inclusion of on-demand content and services within the scope of the Directive. However do not support the liberalisation of regulation that accompanies this extension. We argue that the UK should retain effective regulation across all television and audiovisual services. The UK should not adopt minimum standards set out in the Directive but should maintain existing UK rules where these are stronger, subject to democratic oversight.
 
 


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